Tag Archives: Feminism

Book Review of Princess Grace – Don’t judge a book by its cover

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Princess Grace Front CoverMy daughter is now five and three quarters (those three quarters count a lot for her!) and, as I mentioned in the last post, we visit the library regularly to feed her (thankfully) insatiable appetite for new reading material.

My background in sociology and my move into feminism means that I’m more aware than ever of the cultural brainwashing that goes on through books, especially when it comes to gender and especially in those aimed at children.

So, you can imagine my reaction when my daughter presented me with Princess Grace by Mary Hoffman (2007).

All that pink!

That dress!

That pose!

That jewellery! Read the rest of this entry

Half of us are Women

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An opportunity arose through my role at Women’s Views on News (WVoN) to write a guest blog for the National Women’s Council of Ireland (NWCI). There was no specific brief, both a blessing and curse to writers.

I spent some time considering my options. What was the link between me and my blog, WVoN and the NWCI?

Simple really. Feminism. Or rather, writing about it.

Read my guest blog over at NWCI

The fight for genuine equality between men and women has always been important to me and my time writing for WVoN has introduced me to a mass of fascinating people and subjects and opened my eyes to quite how hard a fight it actually is.

The week I sent the finished blog post to the NWCI had been a roller-coaster of highs and lows for the organisation. Read the rest of this entry

Review – The Female Man

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Take a moment and ask yourself would you hide a secret army of women to fight in the battle against men in a distant alternative future?

The Female Man by Joanna Russ asks just that question. I picked up the book after seeing an article following her death in April this year.  I feel ashamed to admit I’d never heard of Ms Russ prior to that, especially given that she is hailed as the forerunner of feminist science fiction writing and cited as a significant influence on modern authors such as William Gibson. The Female Man was written in 1969/70 and published five years later in a literary genre dominated by men. It received a mixed response, but has since become an extremely well respected novel, nominated for the 1975 Nebula Award for Best Novel and then winning one of the three Retrospective Tiptree Awards in 1996.

I understand why it elicited strong responses, released as it was at the height of the second-wave feminist movement. In many ways it is more a study in feminism than a science fiction story, yet I’m not sure where else it might be fit if not as Sci-Fi.

Read the rest of this entry